How to Cope with Bulimia

Eating Disorder

Bulimia is a life threatening disorder that slowly kills your body. Bulimic individuals will usually consume large amount of food in a short period of time. Then feeling guilty, they would they try to compensate by purging the food out of the body by any means necessary. So if you are a bulimic, you need to stop this right now. Bulimia can result from many things such as depression, anger, low self esteem and other emotional issues. Here are some ways you could learn to cope as a bulimic.

Step One: Bulimia Education

Educate yourself what bulimia is really about. How the disorder does comes about. You also need to understand what bulimia could do to your body. One bad consequence you could learn of bulimia is that the acid from your stomach will rot your teeth. This will result in yellow or jagged teeth. Understand that bulimia has serious consequences such as malnutrition. It could also lead to suicide. Furthermore, purging all the time also causes a serious imbalance in your body and you are putting health in jeopardy.

Step Two: Phone a Friend

Confide in a friend. Tell someone that you can trust about your problem. Ask for their support and ask them to assist you. It must be someone you are able to trust like a teacher, family or a school counselor. They will be more than willing to give you all the support and encouragement that you need.

Step 3: Ask a Therapist

Get professional help. You could always seek advice from recovery centers and a physician. You may need both medical intervention and counseling to get you through this.

Step 4: Change Your Relationship with Food

Learn how to eat properly. You could always seek a nutritionist for advice. Learn how to eat properly. Understand your food issues and how to deal with it.

Lastly, remember to be kind to yourself. You are worthwhile. Never let other people question your self worth. Be persistent and never give up and you will be able to beat this eating disorder!


Bulimia Support Tools

Bulimia is more than just a problem with your weight. An eating disorder isn’t something that’s formed on easy terms. And I don’t blame you, sometimes our circumstances such as our genetics, family background and social environments drive us into this self destructive pattern as a form of coping mechanism. And once we spiral into a maze of negativity, it can be very hard to get out of our self sabotaging ways of behavior. Discover how a hopeless bulimic freed himself from his uncontrolled habits and rid himself from life destroying addictions once and for all!

At the root of bulimia is a need to feel in control. While purging is a strategy for controlling weight, bingeing is an attempt to calm depression, stress, shame, and even boredom. The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bulimia offers new and healthy ways to overcome the distressing feelings and negative body-image beliefs that keep you trapped in this cycle.

DBT and Bulimia
DBT and Bulimia

Do You Struggle with Anger?

Anger Management

Anger is a normal part of the human emotional experience. However, sometimes how we manage our anger can be destructive. Most people learn how to deal with anger as a normal part of growing up based. Our parents model and teach us these tools. Unfortunately not all people, were modeled or taught healthy anger management tools. Without good emotional regulation tools, anger can become overwhelming.

Own Your Anger

The first important step in managing your emotions, is recognizing that you need some in the first place. This is often the hardest step in anger management recovery. Shame and guilt are negative feelings that are often associated with poor emotion management. It is important not to get caught up in these feelings. Shame can a huge barrier to anger recovery. Accepting personal responsibility and taking steps towards recovery is the best solution to preventing further pain.

Think carefully about your life.

  • Do you often shout at and hurt the ones you love the most?
  • Do your loved ones try to avoid you, maybe leaving the room whenever you enter or going to their bedrooms when you get in from work?
  • Have you had problems at work because you were unable to control your emotions?
  • Have you ever had the police involved in your anger management?

If any of these situations sound familiar, then the chances are that you do have an emotional regulation problem.

Quick And Dirty Tools

There are a number of techniques available which can help you to take control control your frustration. Emotion management can be as simple as acknowledging the problem and mastering some simple emotional regulation techniques. Some of these tools include counting until calm, squeezing ice in your fists and exercise. However, in more severe cases it will be necessary to attend therapy, hire an emotion coach, or attend psycho-educational workshops.

The Next Step Is Yours

Think carefully about your life. Do you often shout at and hurt the ones you love the most? Do your partner and/or children often try to avoid you, maybe leaving the room whenever you enter or going to their bedrooms when you get in from work?  Have you had problems at work, or worse still, with the police, because you allowed your anger to get the better of you?  If any of these situations sound familiar, then the chances are that you do have an anger problem and you need to address it for the sake of you and all those around you.

Anger is a normal part of the human emotional experience. However, sometimes how we manage our anger can be destructive. Most people learn how to deal with anger as a normal part of growing up based. Our parents model and teach us these tools. Unfortunately not all people, were modeled or taught healthy anger management tools. Without good emotional regulation tools, anger can become overwhelming. Angriness may be an issue in your everyday life if you let it be. Not only does it interrupt your work and play, but it may hurt you when you least anticipate it. Anger has an underhanded way of making itself known in the rarest of situations, and most you do not have any control over.

How to Support Someone with Bulimia

Anxiety Support and Treatment

When you love someone with bulimia, it is important to be a good support to them. Oftentimes a person with an eating disorder is too embarrassed to seek help. Other times, they may deny that they have a problem. So if you noticed a friend who may bulimic, here are some ways you could approach your friends to help them.

Educate Yourself

Educate yourself. You need to educate yourself on what bulimia is really about. Learn what kind of eating disorder is it. How does it come about? Why does it happen? What are the signs and symptoms of bulimia? What could you do to help them? Educate yourself first before trying to help another.

Ask Questions and Listen

Sit the person down and have a talk with them. Listen with understanding. Do not be judgmental. Tell them all you have learned about bulimia. Tell them you are being concerned about their health, their eating habits. Do not attack them. Attacking them would make them go on the defense and you would never be able to proceed from there on.

Offer Support

Give your support. Tell that them you are there to give them support. You could always be available for them. Tell them that if they do not want to discuss the matter, it’s okay but you are always willing to help them should they change their mind. You could accompany them to a counselor or a physician to get themselves checked.

Social Support

You could also find a social group for your friend with other sufferers of bulimia. Together they would be able to help each other through it. These social groups will create a safe environment for your friend to feel comfortable in.

Lastly, be kind and understanding. Know your limits. You can’t give them the professional help they need. Just be prepared to give them the moral support they need. Fighting bulimia may be a lifelong battle and they need all the help they can get. So be there for them!


Bulimia is more than just a problem with your weight. An eating disorder isn’t something that’s formed on easy terms. And I don’t blame you, sometimes our circumstances such as our genetics, family background and social environments drive us into this self destructive pattern as a form of coping mechanism. And once we spiral into a maze of negativity, it can be very hard to get out of our self sabotaging ways of behavior. Discover how a hopeless bulimic freed himself from his uncontrolled habits and rid himself from life destroying addictions once and for all!

At the root of bulimia is a need to feel in control. While purging is a strategy for controlling weight, bingeing is an attempt to calm depression, stress, shame, and even boredom. The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bulimia offers new and healthy ways to overcome the distressing feelings and negative body-image beliefs that keep you trapped in this cycle.

DBT and Bulimia
DBT and Bulimia

How to Identify and Provide Safe Food for Bulimics

Contrary to popular belief, bulimia does not only affect young teenage girls. Bulimia also affects adult women and young teenage boys and adult men too. Overcoming this eating disorder may take months or even years depending on the individual. One of the ways that could help a bulimic patient overcome this eating disorder is to identify safe food that they could eat on a regular basis. These foods will be non-guilty food and will also provide all the nutrition that they need.

Step 1

First, ask the bulimic patient to keep a diary of food they have eaten for at least a week. The diary should be very detailed and includes everything that was consumed and the emotions that they experienced with the different food. They have to write too if they had purged after eating that food. Remind them to write in their journal immediately right after eating or purging.

Step 2

Then review the diary together with the patient. Work out which food causes negative associations and which food has a positive experience.  List all the negative food under a page entitled foods to avoid. Write down all the food that patients purged on that page too. Then list down all the positive emotion food under a list entitled safe food. Work out which food that the patient has ate but did not purge and add it under that list. The safe food list should also contain fruits and vegetables the patients will enjoy.

Step 3

Next, together with the patient, create a weekly eating plan made of safe food. The plan should include each meal for each day and any snacks. Work out a grocery list with instructions to purchase the right amount of safe food for each meal. Remember to limit the number of days of food that they are allowed to purchase. This will prevent them from going on a bingeing spree. You could also work out recipes that are easy to follow and fast to prepare for the convenience of the patient.

In conclusion, with this food journal, the bulimic patient will now be able to eat healthily without feeling guilty. It is a never ending process but tell them to be patient and never give in to their cravings. Be there for them!


Bulimia Support Products

Bulimia is more than just a problem with your weight. An eating disorder isn’t something that’s formed on easy terms. And I don’t blame you, sometimes our circumstances such as our genetics, family background and social environments drive us into this self destructive pattern as a form of coping mechanism. And once we spiral into a maze of negativity, it can be very hard to get out of our self sabotaging ways of behavior. Discover how a hopeless bulimic freed himself from his uncontrolled habits and rid himself from life destroying addictions once and for all!

At the root of bulimia is a need to feel in control. While purging is a strategy for controlling weight, bingeing is an attempt to calm depression, stress, shame, and even boredom. The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bulimia offers new and healthy ways to overcome the distressing feelings and negative body-image beliefs that keep you trapped in this cycle.

DBT and Bulimia
DBT and Bulimia

7 Signs of Bulimia

Eating Disorder

Bulimia is an eating disorder characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating then followed by efforts to avoid gaining weight by any means necessary. For example, a bulimic would eat large amount of food then they would feel guilty of the huge amount of calories they have just consumed. Feeling so guilty, they would try eliminating the food through purging, fasting, using laxatives, excessive exercising and crash diets. All this defines a bulimic. So what are the signs of binge eating, purging and the physical signs that a bulimic will exhibit.

Binge Eating

  1. There is a lack of control when eating. They are unable to stop eating. They are usually eating large amount of food with no obvious change in weight. Furthermore, they may consume large amount of food in a short period of time.
  2. They are usually alternating between overeating and fasting. After a binge eating spree, they would feel guilty and spend the next day fasting.

Purging signs

  1. Going to a bathroom after meals. There will be vomit smell in the toilet after they have used it.
  2. They might be using laxatives, diuretics or enema. So check your medicine cabinet if any medications are missing. Or they are always frequently going to the pharmacy to purchase these medications
  3. Excessive exercising. They are always working strenuously just to lose the calories that they’ve consumed during their overeating binge.

Physical Signs of Bulimia

  1. Discolored teeth from exposure to stomach acid. Their teeth might be yellow or ragged.
  2. Puffy chipmunk cheeks from repeated vomiting.

These are only a few of the signs and symptoms that you may see in a bulimic. If you do observe any changes in your loved ones, it might be time to seek professional help, before this problem escalates and becomes life threatening.


Bulimia Support Products

Bulimia is more than just a problem with your weight. An eating disorder isn’t something that’s formed on easy terms. And I don’t blame you, sometimes our circumstances such as our genetics, family background and social environments drive us into this self destructive pattern as a form of coping mechanism. And once we spiral into a maze of negativity, it can be very hard to get out of our self sabotaging ways of behavior. Discover how a hopeless bulimic freed himself from his uncontrolled habits and rid himself from life destroying addictions once and for all!

At the root of bulimia is a need to feel in control. While purging is a strategy for controlling weight, bingeing is an attempt to calm depression, stress, shame, and even boredom. The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bulimia offers new and healthy ways to overcome the distressing feelings and negative body-image beliefs that keep you trapped in this cycle.

DBT and Bulimia
DBT and Bulimia